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Orthopaedic

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Spondylosis

It is arthritis that affects that cervical and lumbar spine. Spondylosis is a degenerative spinal disorder, meaning that it's part of aging. As we get older, our bodies tend to wear out—no surprise there. Years of use and overuse can cause parts of the spine, especially the joints, ligaments, and intervertebral discs, to change and not work as well.

Spondylolisthesis

It is a spinal condition that affects the lower vertebrae (spinal bones). This disease causes one of the lower vertebrae to slip forward onto the bone directly beneath it. It’s a painful condition but treatable in most cases. Both therapeutic and surgical methods may be used. Proper exercise techniques can help you avoid this condition.

Osteoarthritis (OA)

It is the most common chronic joint condition which is also called degenerative joint disease, degenerative arthritis, and wear-and-tear arthritis. A joint is where two bones come together. The ends of these bones are covered with protective tissue called cartilage. With OA, this cartilage breaks down, causing the bones within the joint to rub together. This can cause pain, stiffness, and other symptoms. OA occurs most often in older people, although it can occur in adults of any age. It mainly affects the larger joints like knee and hip joints of body.

Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

It is a condition characterized by stiffness and pain in your shoulder joint. Signs and symptoms typically begin gradually, worsen over time and then resolve, usually within one to three years. With frozen shoulder, the capsule becomes so thick and tight that it’s hard to move. Bands of scar tissue form and there’s less of a liquid called synovial fluid to keep the joint lubricated. These things limit motion even more.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

It is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints. It's an autoimmune condition, in which your immune system mistakes the linings of your joints as "foreign," and attacks and damages them, resulting in inflammation and pain.

Slipped Disc/PID/PIVD

It is a common problem seen in adults with a sedentary lifestyle; it may be due to various reasons like faulty posture, trauma. A slipped disc is when a soft cushion of tissue between the bones in your spine pushes out. It's painful if it presses on nerves. A slipped disc may cause symptoms such as pain down the back of the leg (sciatica), numbness, or weakness.

Tennis elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

It is a common problem seen in adults with a sedentary lifestyle; it may be due to various reasons like faulty posture, trauma. A slipped disc is when a soft cushion of tissue between the bones in your spine pushes out. It's painful if it presses on nerves. A slipped disc may cause symptoms such as pain down the back of the leg (sciatica), numbness, or weakness.

Golfer's elbow (Medial Epicondylitis)

It causes pain and inflammation in the tendons that connect the forearm to the elbow. The pain centres on the bony bump on the inner side of your elbow and may radiate into the forearm. It can usually be treated effectively with rest.

A calcaneal spur or heel spur

It is a bony outgrowth from the calcaneal tuberosity (heel bone). Calcaneal spurs are typically detected by a radiographic examination.

Plantar fasciitis

It is one of the most common causes of heel pain that involves the inflammation of a thick band of tissue that runs across the bottom of your foot and connects your heel bone to your toes (plantar fascia). Plantar fasciitis commonly causes stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As you get up and move more, the pain normally decreases, but it might return after long periods of standing or after rising from sitting.

Scoliosis

It causes the spine to curve to one side. It can affect any part of the spine, but the most common regions are at the level of the chest and the lower back. A person with scoliosis will have a C- or S-shaped curve in their spine. A structural curve is permanent, and may be due to another condition. A nonstructural curve is temporary and it is likely to disappears with time. It can appear at any age, but it often presents from the age of 10 to 12 years, or during the teens, but infants can sometimes have symptoms.

Torticollis/ wry neck

It is a dystonic condition defined by an abnormal, asymmetrical head or neck position, which may be due to a variety of causes. Torticollis is a fixed or dynamic tilt, rotation, with flexion or extension of the head and/or neck. The type of torticollis can be described depending on the positions of the head and neck. laterocollis: the head is tipped toward the shoulder, rotational torticollis: the head rotates along the longitudal axis, anterocollis: forward flexion of the head and neck, retrocollis: hyperextension of head and neck backward.

Post traumatic/surgical stiffness

It is the decrease in range of motion of a joint due to period of immobilisation. This is very common is found in elbow joint. A proper manual mobilisation of the joint by a physiotherapist gives better result.

Post surgical weakness

It is weakness of the muscle undergone surgery. Due to incision over a muscle leads to decrease in muscle strength which need proper strengthening exercises to come back to normal strength.

Sprains and strains

Sprains and strains are common injuries that share similar signs and symptoms, but involve different parts of your body. A sprain is a stretching or tearing of ligaments — the tough bands of fibrous tissue that connect two bones together in your joints. The most common location for a sprain is in your ankle. A strain is a stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon. A tendon is a fibrous cord of tissue that connects muscles to bones. Strains often occur in the lower back and in the hamstring muscle in the back of your thigh.

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